An invention and history of an ironclad

A late Bronze Age sword or dagger blade Metallic copper occurs on the surface of weathered copper ore deposits and copper was used before copper smelting was known. Copper smelting is believed to have originated when the technology of pottery kilns allowed sufficiently high temperatures. Tin sources and trade in ancient times Bronze was a major advance over stone as a material for making tools, both because of its mechanical properties like strength and ductility and because it could be cast in molds to make intricately shaped objects. Bronze significantly advanced shipbuilding technology with better tools and bronze nails.

An invention and history of an ironclad

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Technology and Culture By James Tertius De Kay. Johns Hopkins University Press, The subtitle of James De Kay's book says it all. In the tradition of Samuel Smiles, De Kay offers a linear and heroic presentation of John Ericsson fighting a reactionary naval establishment to present the naval world a revolutionary technology that became "the right ship, at precisely the right place, at precisely the right time" p.

Although well-written, this book is derivative, presents a flawed history, and contributes no new historical insight.

Our Little Monitor | Naval Historical Foundation

De Kay writes within a dated navalist historiographical framework, bemoaning the United States' "minimal naval service" of "only" forty-two ships in commission in p. He ignores the antebellum continentalist strategy that was a foundation of this "minimal" navy, whose mission was protection of American maritime commercial interests.

He incorrectly states that many of the navy's most valuable officers "went south" and says of those who remained loyal "too many were over age and out of touch" p. De Kay's claim that Monitor "revolutionized naval warfare" p.

Ironclad | ship | ashio-midori.com

Civil War historian James McPherson's jacket endorsement states that De Kay "has made the technological story of the Monitor's design and construction by the ingenious John Ericsson understandable and exciting.

Mindell goes beyond the heroic inventor to include "patrons, contractors, constructors, rivals, users, public imagery, and literary expressions" in Monitor's history p. He correctly argues that "Monitor did not revolutionize warfare" and claims--perhaps too much --that "it redefined the relationship between people and machines in war" p.

Drawing on John Keegan, Mindell is interested in the effect of the "face of technology" in war or considering "what becomes of people when the face of battle becomes that of a machine" p.

Write for us!

In this he relies, by necessity but perhaps too singularly, on the detailed letters [End Page ] written by William Keeler, a wartime volunteer who became a staff officer acting assistant paymaster and served in Monitor. Mindell begins with a discussion of naval technology between and This is followed by treatment of the complicated entrepreneurial and political maneuvering that brought John Ericsson's Monitor into existence.

Mindell's third chapter is devoted to constructing an "epistolary Monitor" based on Keeler's letters. In the next three chapters Mindell discusses the crew's "life in the artificial world," the Battle of Hampton Roads, and the "iron ship in a glass case"--the often ignored history of Monitor after her famous battle with CSS Virginia until her sinking in December He then presents contemporary assessments of Monitor by "utilitarians.

In his concluding remarks, Mindell discusses the "mechanical face" of industrial war.

Related Stories

The book evidences a sound grasp of nineteenthMonitor: The Story of the Legendary Civil War Ironclad and the Man Whose Invention Changed the Course of History [James Tertius Dekay, James Tertius De Reviews: 9. 8/11/ • American History Reviews, Reviews THE MONITOR: THE STORY OF THE LEGENDARY CIVIL WAR IRONCLAD AND THE MAN WHOSE INVENTION CHANGED THE COURSE OF HISTORY, by James Tertius deKay, Walker and Company, pages, $ Description: The Ironclad was a revolutionary weapon of war.

Although iron was used for protection in the Far East during the 16th century, it was the 19th century and the American Civil War that heralded the first modern armored self-propelled warships.

With the parallel pressures of civil war and the industrial revolution, technology advanced at a breakneck speed. Ironclad warships were another innovation of the American Civil War.

Like submarines and balloons, the ironclad war ship wasn't invented during the Civil War, but the Civil War was the first time ironclads saw widespread, effective use.

In , the Korean Royal Navy launched what some believe to be the first ironclad warship. Ironclad warships were another innovation of the American Civil War.

An invention and history of an ironclad

Like submarines and balloons, the ironclad war ship wasn't invented during the Civil War, but the Civil War was the first time ironclads saw widespread, effective use.. In , the Korean Royal Navy launched what some believe to be the first ironclad warship. Ironclad: Ironclad, type of warship developed in Europe and the United States in the midth century, characterized by the iron casemates that protected the hull.

In the Crimean War (–56) the French and British successfully attacked Russian fortifications with “floating batteries,” ironclad barges.

John Ericsson Inventor, John Ericsson Monitor Ironclad Ship