The life and social contributions of dorothy day

Her nominally religious family moved to the San Franciso Bay area and then to Chicago where she was baptized in the Episcopal Church. She attended the University of Illinois at Urbana and became interested in radical social causes as a way to help workers and the poor. Inshe left the university and moved to New York City where she worked as a journalist on socialist newspapers, participated in protest movements, and developed friendships with many famous artists and writers. During this time, she also experienced failed love affairs, a marriage, a suicide attempt, and an abortion.

The life and social contributions of dorothy day

But it would not be too much of an exaggeration. For nearly half a century, she was the most famous, most influential, and most energetic voice proclaiming that Catholics could and should be nonviolent, precisely because they are Catholic. As founder and leader of the Catholic Worker movement from its creation inDay — insisted that the movement affirm nonviolence as a basic principle.

She inspired many Catholics to commit to nonviolence and to explore specifically Catholic ways of expressing and explaining their commitment. Muste and so many others of her generation, her journey began during World War I.

Unlike Muste and the others, though, she did not begin with religious faith and then move toward peace and justice in the political realm.

Her path was quite the opposite. From her childhood, she showed a powerful love of ordinary working people and of nature. She denounced World War I and preparations for future war as the inevitable fruit of capitalist imperialism. But she wrote about all this on a purely secular basis.

At the same time, Day was gradually drawn toward the Catholic Church, where she was baptized in She became a Catholic, she said, because her love of and joy in the human and natural world led her to want even greater love and joy, the supernatural love and joy that she could find only in God and His Church.

The life and social contributions of dorothy day

She wanted to live a saintly life, in which every moment would be filled with the kind of love that, she claimed, could only be found in a religious life. She also became Catholic because she wanted to escape a life that was, in her own words, "doubting and hesitating, undisciplined and amoral. But she never considered leaving the natural world behind.

She knew that she wanted to combine pious Catholicism with active organizing efforts to create a new society, one that would alleviate poverty and offer justice for working people: But at that time Catholics were universally, and often bitterly, opposed to communism because of its militant atheism.

She still could not see how to link her political and religious beliefs, to be both Catholic and a revolutionary. For Maurin, it was self-evident that a Catholic not only could, but should, be a social revolutionary.

Yet the revolution Maurin promoted, to whomever would listen, was quite different from the revolution of Lenin and Stalin in several important respects. With Maurin providing the inspiring ideas, and Dorothy Day the written words, organizing skill, and driving passion, the Catholic Worker movement was born in Along with it was born, for the first time in the U.

The basic principles of this movement would be familiar to members of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and other Protestant nonviolence activists. The Catholic Worker movement put rich flesh on the bones of those abstract principles by drawing on all the resources Roman Catholicism, with its ancient, rich, and very detailed doctrine, language, symbolism, ritual, and church hierarchy.

She always cared, first and foremost, about the religious truth and life she found in the Church. Nor was it a matter of theoretical analysis followed out to its logical conclusions.

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Her commitment came far more from her heart and direct religious experience than from any intellectual theories or religious doctrines.

Indeed, like so many great nonviolence leaders, she never developed her beliefs in any systematic theological or theoretical way.About Her Life.

Brief Biography; A Saint for Our Time; A Woman of Conscience; The Catholic Worker Movement; Dorothy Day was born in Brooklyn, New York on November 8, , the third child of Grace and John Day.

She attended the University of Illinois at Urbana and became interested in radical social causes as a way to help . Second, Dorothy Day taught me that justice is not just a project for the government, do-good agencies, or radical movements designing a new social order in which all the world’s problems will be solved.

It’s for you and me, here and now, right where we are. Explore the life and works of Catholic social reformer Dorothy Day, founder of The Catholic Worker and the Catholic Worker Movement, at ashio-midori.com Dorothy Day was an activist who worked for such social causes as pacifism and women's suffrage through the prism of the Catholic ashio-midori.com: Nov 08, She avoided campus social life, and supported herself rather than rely on money from her father, buying all her clothing and shoes from discount stores.

Dorothy Day () Therese: A Life of Therese of Lisieux, Templegate Publishing; Dorothy Day, ed. Phyllis Zagano (). Explore the wisdom of Dorothy Day This collection of Dorothy Day's writings is for spiritual seekers and committed believers alike.

Reading Dorothy Day is an invitation to explore what it means to lead an authentic human and Christian life in our time. Second, Dorothy Day taught me that justice is not just a project for the government, do-good agencies, or radical movements designing a new social order in which all the world’s problems will be solved.

It’s for you and me, here and now, right where we are.

Catholic Worker Movement